Whether you are providing COVID-19 immunizations at this time or not, you will no doubt be getting questions on the current status of vaccine approvals and who / when / how people will be immunized.

Here are some resources to help you answer common questions about the immunization process and current plans so you can help inform your patients.

Alberta’s COVID-19 Immunization Plan

Albertans born in 2009 or before (turning 12+) can get their first and second doses now.

For more, please visit: https://www.alberta.ca/covid19-vaccine.aspx

BC’s COVID-19 Immunization Plan

BC is using the national framework and guidance to immunization, adapting it to fit the provincial context. Immunizations will be run through public health and the BC health authorities through dedicated immunization clinics in communities across the province.

Main Immunization clinics

Immunization clinics are being organized in 172 communities in B.C and will be overseen by your local health authority. The clinics will be held at large centres including:

  • School gymnasiums
  • Arenas
  • Convention halls
  • Community halls

Mobile clinics will be available for some rural communities and for people who are harder to reach such as those who are homeless, or those who are homebound due to mobility issues.

How to get Vaccinated for COVID-19

PATIENTS 12+ years (born in 2009 or earlier) are eligible for vaccination.

  1. REGISTER AND MAKE AN APPOINTMENT:

Direct patients to REGISTER TO GET VACCINATED

If you don’t have a Personal Health Number, you need to register by phone. A Personal Health Number will be created for you. It doesn’t matter if they are a Canadian citizen or not. Register even if they have already received dose 1 in another location. All of their information will be kept private and will never be shared with other agencies or parts of government.

Online: REGISTER ONLINE requires:

  • First and last name,
  • Date of birth,
  • Postal code,
  • Personal Health Number, and
  • an email address that gets checked regularly or a phone number that can receive text messages

Phone:

  • 1-833-838-2323 (Translator services are available, Open 7 days a week from 7:00AM to 7:00PM)
  • Telephone for the Deaf: Dial 711
  • Video Relay Services (VRS) provides sign language interpretation free for registered deaf, hard of hearing or speech-impaired people.

At a Service BC office: Patients can register in-person at all Service BC offices. Office hours vary by location.

  1. DROP-IN:

Drop-in vaccine clinics are in communities around B.C. There is no need to register online or phone before arrival.

What to expect at the vaccine clinic

We recommend patients review information on COVID-19 vaccine safety from HealthlinkBC before their clinic visit. You can expect to be at the clinic for 30 to 60 minutes in total.

For youth 12-17 it’s also a good idea to bring one piece of child identification, for example:

  • BC Services card
  • B.C. driver’s licence
  • School ID card
  • Birth certificate
  • Bank card

Direct patients to follow the instructions provided, bring their booking confirmation and photo ID, wear a short sleeve shirt and mask.

Second doses will be coordinated directly with people, not through their primary care offices. They will get an invitation by text, email or phone call to book their second dose appointment. Second doses will be administered approximately 28 days after dose one.

Proof of Vaccination and the BC Vaccine Card

In BC, proof of vaccination is now required to access some events, services and businesses. The easiest way to show proof is using the BC Vaccine Card. For further details including privacy, and places the card is required for entry, please see the Government of BC’s vaccine card website.

Getting the BC Vaccine Card

Patients can save the digital version to their phone or tablet, or print a paper copy to carry in their wallet. There are also options available if patients do not have access to a smartphone, computer, and printer. For further instructions please see the Government of BC’s vaccine card website.

Online:

  1. Log-in through the Health Gateway.
  2. Save a copy to the digital device or print a physical copy.

By Phone:

  • 1-833-838-2323 (Translator services are available, Open 7 days a week from 7:00AM to 7:00PM)
  • Telephone for the Deaf: Dial 711
  • Video Relay Services (VRS) provides sign language interpretation free for registered deaf, hard of hearing or speech-impaired people.

Callers cannot request a copy for someone else

Print a Copy at a Service BC Office: Patients can print a copy in-person at all Service BC offices. Office hours vary by location.

If a printed copy is needed for a child, they must be taken with them to the office.

Manitoba’s COVID-19 Immunization Plan

Manitoba has a plan to expand immunization for COVID-19 that ensures the health care system, vulnerable populations and priority groups have the maximum protection possible. Please find the Province of Manitoba’s link below, to view the most recent information scroll down the page to reports. Here you will find the most recent technical briefing on vaccine criteria.

Getting Vaccinated at a Medical Clinic

The AstraZeneca/COVISHIELD vaccine doses will primarily be used to provide COVID-19 vaccines in doctors’ offices and pharmacies. Manitoba public health officials have developed guidance for the use of the AstraZeneca/Covishield vaccine. This information is being shared with providers and posted online to guide how appointments are booked once the vaccine is available in Manitoba clinics and pharmacies.

Please find the latest criteria here:

Getting vaccinated at a Super-Sites or Pop-up Clinic

You can book your COVID-19 vaccine appointment online. If you are eligible to be immunized, you can now book your vaccine appointment online for any of our supersites, quickly and conveniently.

To book, you’ll need to create an account with your email address and health card number.  You can link more than one person to the same account, so that you can book for family members and loved ones as they become eligible. 

If you don’t have an email address, the call centre continues to be available at 1-844-626-8222 (1-844-MAN-VACC) to book appointments at supersites and pop-up clinics. Daily hours of operation are from 6:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.

Below you can see if meet current eligibility.

Proof of Immunization

Immunization Records in Manitoba are available online, printing the record is possible through the portal.

New Brunswick’s COVID-19 Immunization Plan

New Brunswick’s COVID-19 Immunization plan is being designed to best fit the population needs. It is summarized in this diagram and more details are available through New Brunswick’s COVID-19 vaccine site.

For a list of additional COVID-19 resources please see:

Newfoundland’s COVID-19 Immunization Plan

Newfoundland and Labrador’s COVID-19 Immunization plan is being designed to best fit the population needs. See more information here:

Nova Scotia’s COVID-19 Immunization Plan

Nova Scotia’s COVID-19 Immunization Plan is being designed to best fit the population needs. See more information here:

Ontario’s COVID-19 Immunization Plan

COVID-19 Vaccines Resource

Vaccine rollout in Ontario

For Ontario’s current vaccination status, see COVID-19 vaccines for Ontario (Government of Ontario).
For up-to-date dose delivery numbers, see Vaccines and treatments for COVID-19: Vaccine rollout (Health Canada).

Vaccination eligibility

All individuals who will turn 12 or older in 2021 are eligible for COVID-19 vaccination in Ontario.

——

MOH is recommending a third dose of a COVID-19 mRNA vaccine (the same vaccine product as 2nd dose if possible) for certain high-risk populations. Details about facilitation of these doses is forthcoming (MOH, August 18, 2021).

  • Immunocompromised populations: Administration 2 months after 2nd dose
    • Transplant recipients, including solid organ transplant and hematopoietic stem cell transplants
    • Individuals receiving therapy with an anti-CD20 agent commonly used for conditions such as multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, leukemias/lymphoma, etc.
    • Individuals receiving active treatment for malignant hematologic disorders (chemotherapy, targeted therapies, immunotherapy for AML, CML, ALL, CLL, etc)
  • Vulnerable elderly in high-risk congregate settings: Administration 5 months after 2nd dose
    • Residents of long-term care homes and high-risk retirement homes
    • Elder Care lodges
  • NEWCOVID-19 vaccine administration errors and deviations

Following the identification of an inadvertent vaccine administration error or deviation, healthcare providers should (MOH, June 2021):

  • Inform the recipient of the vaccine administration error/deviation as soon as possible after it has been identified.
  • Inform the recipient of any implications/recommendations for future doses, and the possibility for local or systemic adverse events (if applicable and as known).
  • If an inadvertent vaccine administration error or deviation results in an AEFI, complete Ontario’s AEFI reporting form, including details of the error or deviation and submit to your local PHU.
  • Determine how the vaccine administration error or deviation occurred and promptly implement strategies to prevent it from happening again.
  • Serologic testing to assess vaccine-induced immunity following COVID-19 vaccine errors or deviations is generally not recommended to guide management decisions. Providers are encouraged to contact their local PHU or PHO for advice if they are considering using serology to investigate an error or deviation.
  • NEWScarborough Health Network VaxFacts Clinic

New fee codes > G593 (COVID-19 vaccine)

PEI’s COVID-19 Immunization Plan

PEI’s COVID-19 Immunization Plan is being designed to best fit the population needs. See more information here:

Quebec’s COVID-19 Immunization Plan

Nous n’avons pas reçu de contenu provincial spécifique pour ici, veuillez vous référer aux documents nationaux ou à votre site CDC provincial.

We have not received specific provincial content for here, please refer to the national materials or your provincial CDC site.

Saskatchewan’s COVID-19 Immunization Plan

Saskatchewan’s COVID-19 Vaccine Delivery Plan is designed to save lives and stop the spread of COVID-19. The Saskatchewan Plan has two phases.

Saskatchewan’s COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution Plan is built on the foundation of age as the main risk factor. Phase 1 is focused on vaccinating high-risk populations, people of advanced age, and health care workers that have been identified as a priority. Phase 2 is focused on vaccinating the general population by age, as well as the clinically extremely vulnerable and people in emergency shelters and group homes. Focusing on age as a primary risk factor will enable Saskatchewan residents to receive the COVID-19 vaccine in a more efficient and timely manner.

Summary of Phases:

Saskatchewan is now in phase 1 of the plan. Immunization is being targeted to priority populations, including long-term care residents, health care workers and vulnerable populations.

  • Phase 1 includes long-term care and personal care home residents and staff, residents 70 years and older in all communities, residents over the age of 50 living in remote/Northern Saskatchewan and high-risk healthcare workers.
  • Phase 2 includes the general public and will focus on vaccinating the general public in 10 year increments starting with those 60-69 and ending with those 18-29.

Proof of Immunization:

In Saskatchewan electronic and paper copies of vaccination records will be available. People will receive a wallet card with a record of their COVID-19 vaccination and their record will also be stored electronically on MySaskHealthRecord.

Provincial COVID-19 Immunization Plans

Error: we are not able to resolve your region and cannot show you provincial content at this time. Please review your provincial materials below.

Alberta

Albertans born in 2009 or before (turning 12+) can get their first and second doses now.

For more, please visit: https://www.alberta.ca/covid19-vaccine.aspx

BC

BC is using the national framework and guidance to immunization, adapting it to fit the provincial context. Immunizations will be run through public health and the BC health authorities through dedicated immunization clinics in communities across the province.

Main Immunization clinics

Immunization clinics are being organized in 172 communities in B.C and will be overseen by your local health authority. The clinics will be held at large centres including:

  • School gymnasiums
  • Arenas
  • Convention halls
  • Community halls

Mobile clinics will be available for some rural communities and for people who are harder to reach such as those who are homeless, or those who are homebound due to mobility issues.

How to get Vaccinated for COVID-19

PATIENTS 12+ years (born in 2009 or earlier) are eligible for vaccination.

  1. REGISTER AND MAKE AN APPOINTMENT:

Direct patients to REGISTER TO GET VACCINATED

If you don’t have a Personal Health Number, you need to register by phone. A Personal Health Number will be created for you. It doesn’t matter if they are a Canadian citizen or not. Register even if they have already received dose 1 in another location. All of their information will be kept private and will never be shared with other agencies or parts of government.

Online: REGISTER ONLINE requires:

  • First and last name,
  • Date of birth,
  • Postal code,
  • Personal Health Number, and
  • an email address that gets checked regularly or a phone number that can receive text messages

Phone:

  • 1-833-838-2323 (Translator services are available, Open 7 days a week from 7:00AM to 7:00PM)
  • Telephone for the Deaf: Dial 711
  • Video Relay Services (VRS) provides sign language interpretation free for registered deaf, hard of hearing or speech-impaired people.

At a Service BC office: Patients can register in-person at all Service BC offices. Office hours vary by location.

  1. DROP-IN:

Drop-in vaccine clinics are in communities around B.C. There is no need to register online or phone before arrival.

What to expect at the vaccine clinic

We recommend patients review information on COVID-19 vaccine safety from HealthlinkBC before their clinic visit. You can expect to be at the clinic for 30 to 60 minutes in total.

For youth 12-17 it’s also a good idea to bring one piece of child identification, for example:

  • BC Services card
  • B.C. driver’s licence
  • School ID card
  • Birth certificate
  • Bank card

Direct patients to follow the instructions provided, bring their booking confirmation and photo ID, wear a short sleeve shirt and mask.

Second doses will be coordinated directly with people, not through their primary care offices. They will get an invitation by text, email or phone call to book their second dose appointment. Second doses will be administered approximately 28 days after dose one.

Proof of Vaccination and the BC Vaccine Card

In BC, proof of vaccination is now required to access some events, services and businesses. The easiest way to show proof is using the BC Vaccine Card. For further details including privacy, and places the card is required for entry, please see the Government of BC’s vaccine card website.

Getting the BC Vaccine Card

Patients can save the digital version to their phone or tablet, or print a paper copy to carry in their wallet. There are also options available if patients do not have access to a smartphone, computer, and printer. For further instructions please see the Government of BC’s vaccine card website.

Online:

  1. Log-in through the Health Gateway.
  2. Save a copy to the digital device or print a physical copy.

By Phone:

  • 1-833-838-2323 (Translator services are available, Open 7 days a week from 7:00AM to 7:00PM)
  • Telephone for the Deaf: Dial 711
  • Video Relay Services (VRS) provides sign language interpretation free for registered deaf, hard of hearing or speech-impaired people.

Callers cannot request a copy for someone else

Print a Copy at a Service BC Office: Patients can print a copy in-person at all Service BC offices. Office hours vary by location.

If a printed copy is needed for a child, they must be taken with them to the office.

Manitoba

Manitoba’s COVID-19 Immunization Plan

Manitoba has a plan to expand immunization for COVID-19 that ensures the health care system, vulnerable populations and priority groups have the maximum protection possible. Please find the Province of Manitoba’s link below, to view the most recent information scroll down the page to reports. Here you will find the most recent technical briefing on vaccine criteria.

Getting Vaccinated at a Medical Clinic

The AstraZeneca/COVISHIELD vaccine doses will primarily be used to provide COVID-19 vaccines in doctors’ offices and pharmacies. Manitoba public health officials have developed guidance for the use of the AstraZeneca/Covishield vaccine. This information is being shared with providers and posted online to guide how appointments are booked once the vaccine is available in Manitoba clinics and pharmacies.

Please find the latest criteria here:

Getting vaccinated at a Super-Sites or Pop-up Clinic

You can book your COVID-19 vaccine appointment online. If you are eligible to be immunized, you can now book your vaccine appointment online for any of our supersites, quickly and conveniently.

To book, you’ll need to create an account with your email address and health card number.  You can link more than one person to the same account, so that you can book for family members and loved ones as they become eligible. 

If you don’t have an email address, the call centre continues to be available at 1-844-626-8222 (1-844-MAN-VACC) to book appointments at supersites and pop-up clinics. Daily hours of operation are from 6:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.

Below you can see if meet current eligibility.

Proof of Immunization

Immunization Records in Manitoba are available online, printing the record is possible through the portal.

New Brunswick

New Brunswick’s COVID-19 Immunization plan is being designed to best fit the population needs. It is summarized in this diagram and more details are available through New Brunswick’s COVID-19 vaccine site.

For a list of additional COVID-19 resources please see:

Newfoundland

Newfoundland and Labrador’s COVID-19 Immunization plan is being designed to best fit the population needs. See more information here:

Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia’s COVID-19 Immunization Plan is being designed to best fit the population needs. See more information here:

Ontario

COVID-19 Vaccines Resource

Vaccine rollout in Ontario

For Ontario’s current vaccination status, see COVID-19 vaccines for Ontario (Government of Ontario).
For up-to-date dose delivery numbers, see Vaccines and treatments for COVID-19: Vaccine rollout (Health Canada).

Vaccination eligibility

All individuals who will turn 12 or older in 2021 are eligible for COVID-19 vaccination in Ontario.

——

MOH is recommending a third dose of a COVID-19 mRNA vaccine (the same vaccine product as 2nd dose if possible) for certain high-risk populations. Details about facilitation of these doses is forthcoming (MOH, August 18, 2021).

  • Immunocompromised populations: Administration 2 months after 2nd dose
    • Transplant recipients, including solid organ transplant and hematopoietic stem cell transplants
    • Individuals receiving therapy with an anti-CD20 agent commonly used for conditions such as multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, leukemias/lymphoma, etc.
    • Individuals receiving active treatment for malignant hematologic disorders (chemotherapy, targeted therapies, immunotherapy for AML, CML, ALL, CLL, etc)
  • Vulnerable elderly in high-risk congregate settings: Administration 5 months after 2nd dose
    • Residents of long-term care homes and high-risk retirement homes
    • Elder Care lodges
  • NEWCOVID-19 vaccine administration errors and deviations

Following the identification of an inadvertent vaccine administration error or deviation, healthcare providers should (MOH, June 2021):

  • Inform the recipient of the vaccine administration error/deviation as soon as possible after it has been identified.
  • Inform the recipient of any implications/recommendations for future doses, and the possibility for local or systemic adverse events (if applicable and as known).
  • If an inadvertent vaccine administration error or deviation results in an AEFI, complete Ontario’s AEFI reporting form, including details of the error or deviation and submit to your local PHU.
  • Determine how the vaccine administration error or deviation occurred and promptly implement strategies to prevent it from happening again.
  • Serologic testing to assess vaccine-induced immunity following COVID-19 vaccine errors or deviations is generally not recommended to guide management decisions. Providers are encouraged to contact their local PHU or PHO for advice if they are considering using serology to investigate an error or deviation.
  • NEWScarborough Health Network VaxFacts Clinic

New fee codes > G593 (COVID-19 vaccine)

PEI

PEI’s COVID-19 Immunization Plan is being designed to best fit the population needs. See more information here:

Quebec

Nous n’avons pas reçu de contenu provincial spécifique pour ici, veuillez vous référer aux documents nationaux ou à votre site CDC provincial.

We have not received specific provincial content for here, please refer to the national materials or your provincial CDC site.

Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan’s COVID-19 Vaccine Delivery Plan is designed to save lives and stop the spread of COVID-19. The Saskatchewan Plan has two phases.

Saskatchewan’s COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution Plan is built on the foundation of age as the main risk factor. Phase 1 is focused on vaccinating high-risk populations, people of advanced age, and health care workers that have been identified as a priority. Phase 2 is focused on vaccinating the general population by age, as well as the clinically extremely vulnerable and people in emergency shelters and group homes. Focusing on age as a primary risk factor will enable Saskatchewan residents to receive the COVID-19 vaccine in a more efficient and timely manner.

Summary of Phases:

Saskatchewan is now in phase 1 of the plan. Immunization is being targeted to priority populations, including long-term care residents, health care workers and vulnerable populations.

  • Phase 1 includes long-term care and personal care home residents and staff, residents 70 years and older in all communities, residents over the age of 50 living in remote/Northern Saskatchewan and high-risk healthcare workers.
  • Phase 2 includes the general public and will focus on vaccinating the general public in 10 year increments starting with those 60-69 and ending with those 18-29.

Proof of Immunization:

In Saskatchewan electronic and paper copies of vaccination records will be available. People will receive a wallet card with a record of their COVID-19 vaccination and their record will also be stored electronically on MySaskHealthRecord.

National Immunization Approach

PHAC has provided overall guidance and coordinates vaccine distribution with the provinces. For the most up to date and official Canadian information, see the following links:

Here is a useful poster (in multiple languages) you can get and print or email for patients:

Overall Approach to Prioritization for Immunization

A common question we are getting is: how are people being prioritized? It can be helpful to talk about these four aspects being used to guide prioritization. People are higher priority if they are:

  • At high risk for mortality (and hospitalization) from COVID-19 infection
  • Providing healthcare services (and later other essential services)
  • At higher risk of potential exposure due to congregate living situations
  • Remote where it would be hard to access higher levels of care if they were to become sick.

Information on Approved Vaccines

Vaccines are approved nationally. Currently there are four approved vaccines in Canada. The Centre for Effective Practice in Ontario has a useful recent and updated evidence review on the vaccine trials:

Health Canada has an official page of information on COVID-19 vaccines:

Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine

Given the strict distribution and handling requirements for this vaccine, we are not expecting it to be used outside of specific, larger scale, centralized clinics and perhaps some rural-remote settings.

Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine

The Moderna vaccine, while it has specific handling requirements, is much easier to handle in community-based settings.

AstraZeneca COVID-19 Vaccine

Health Canada authorized the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine on February 26, 2021. This is an exciting update for primary are as this vaccine uses an adenovirus vector and so has the same handling requirements as other vaccines we have in our offices, and thus will not require retooling our refrigeration in primary care. As of March 1, the distribution plans at the national and provincial levels have not been worked out, but we are expecting some changes.

Janssen COVID-19 vaccine

Health Canada authorized the Janssen COVID-19 vaccine on March 05, 2021. It is a viral vector vaccine that only requires a single dose. This is potentially another option for primary care clinics as it would use our existing vaccine distribution chain and not require additional cold storage.

Emerging Evidence for Special Populations

Several groups have been highlighted as potentially excluded for immunizations. Many simply were excluded from the initial studies (e.g. immunocompromised patients, pregnant or breastfeeding women, children) and some studies are ongoing to better understand actual risks, if any. In general, a discussion and informed consent is critical for all patients, particularly those who need to understand the lack of current research. The Centre for Effective Practice has summarized the populations to consider below.

COVID-19 Information for Patients

Here are several quick, up to date resources from Health Canada to help you answer some of your patients’ questions around COVID-19:

COVID-19 Immunization Information for Patients

Here is a poster you can print in multiple languages for your office or link to the PDF in email newsletters:

There are several resources designed by and for Indigenous Peoples, including:

Alberta’s Patient Information Links on COVID-19

BC CDC’s Patient Information Links on COVID-19

BC has a number of general handouts available for patients with symptoms, those who are self-isolating, etc., as well as some frequently asked questions:

The BC CDC has a lot of information for patients on immunization planning including:

Manitoba’s Patient Information Links on COVID-19

Please find below Doctor’s of Manitoba Vaccine Resource Centre. This resource has suggested scripts and email templates, webinars and a guide to responding to vaccine hesitancy. 

New Brunswick’s Patient Information Links on COVID-19

Covid 19 Vaccine Get the Facts

Covid 19 Vaccine Myths and Facts

Pregnant and breastfeeding

Immunocompromised

Guidance for patients on persons with Autoimmune conditions and/or Immunosuppression. Complex medical conditions

Newfoundland’s Patient Information Links on COVID-19

We have not received specific provincial content for here, please refer to the national materials or your provincial CDC site.

Nova Scotia’s Patient Information Links on COVID-19

We have not received specific provincial content for here, please refer to the national materials or your provincial CDC site.

Ontario’s Patient Information Links on COVID-19

COVID-19 Vaccines Resource

Does the AstraZeneca vaccine cause Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS)?

Can the mRNA vaccines cause Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS)?

PrOTCT Plan for the COVID-19 Vaccine Discussion *Engage Vaccine Hesitant Patients section*

  • UPDATED: Emerging evidence

Emerging evidence > Viral vector vaccines and adverse effects (Guillain-Barré Syndrome, Capillary Leak Syndrome, Vaccine-induced Immune Thrombotic Thrombocytopenia)

Quebec’s Patient Information Links on COVID-19

Nous n’avons pas reçu de contenu provincial spécifique pour ici, veuillez vous référer aux documents nationaux ou à votre site CDC provincial.

We have not received specific provincial content for here, please refer to the national materials or your provincial CDC site.

Saskatchewan’s Patient Information Links on COVID-19

Please see the COVID-19 Vaccine Question and Answer Page.

Province Specific Patient Information on COVID-19

Error: we are not able to resolve your region and cannot show you provincial content at this time.

BC

BC has a number of general handouts available for patients with symptoms, who are self-isolating, etc., as well as some frequently asked questions:

The BC CDC has a lot of information for patients on immunization planning including:

Manitoba

Manitoba’s Patient Information Links on COVID-19

Please find below Doctor’s of Manitoba Vaccine Resource Centre. This resource has suggested scripts and email templates, webinars and a guide to responding to vaccine hesitancy. 

New Brunswick

Covid 19 Vaccine Get the Facts

Covid 19 Vaccine Myths and Facts

Pregnant and breastfeeding

Immunocompromised

Guidance for patients on persons with Autoimmune conditions and/or Immunosuppression. Complex medical conditions

Newfoundland

We have not received specific provincial content for here, please refer to the national materials or your provincial CDC site.

Nova Scotia

We have not received specific provincial content for here, please refer to the national materials or your provincial CDC site.

Ontario
Quebec

Nous n’avons pas reçu de contenu provincial spécifique pour ici, veuillez vous référer aux documents nationaux ou à votre site CDC provincial.

We have not received specific provincial content for here, please refer to the national materials or your provincial CDC site.

Other recommended sites:

Other COVID-19 Information

This guide focuses on immunizations, if you have other general COVID-19 questions, please look to these sources:

And here are some additional COVID-19 resources that provide more broad information on COVID-19:

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